my-tardis-sense-is-tingling:

Titus Andronicus: "Well That Escalated Quickly"
Romeo and Juliet: "Shut Up, You’re Like 12"
Julius Caesar: "I Came Out Here to Run the Roman Empire and I Am Honestly Feeling So Attacked Right Now"
Hamlet: "[AGGRESSIVELY PRETENDS TO GO INSANE AND IN THE PROCESS GOES ACTUALLY INSANE MAYBE]"
Othello: "Othello: Is my wife cheating on me?? Iago: Bitch, she might be."
King Lear: "Shows Up To Realization of Commonality with Humanity and Renouncement of Titles as Identity-Definers 15 Years Late With Starbucks"
Macbeth: "Did It For the Vine"
Antony and Cleopatra: "Much Rome. Very Egypt. Such Different. Wow."

(via derevko)

2 days ago | 6,587 notes (originally from my-tardis-sense-is-tingling)

sometimes, i think the way fandom and the world views female characters seems to say that the women and girls that aren’t ready to fight back yet aren’t worthy of our support and affection and it makes me sad.

not every person is capable of being their own warrior yet. sometimes it takes the support of people around them to enable them to start fighting back. 


"You’re going to have people who are going to say ‘Oh, you know like, she just writes songs about her ex-boyfriends’ and I think frankly that’s a very sexist angle to take. No one says that about Ed Sheeran. No one says it about Bruno Mars. They’re all writing songs about their exes, their current girlfriends, their love-life, and no one raises a red flag there."

+ Taylor Swift on some peoples views on her songwriting. (x)

(Source: thebentley13, via milkshakemicrowave)

2 days ago | 35,244 notes (originally from thebentley13)

the-pietriarchy:

I’m going to die alone and miserable but at least I’ll find peace knowing that I never thirsted over benedict cumberbatch

(via petitebelette)

2 days ago | 7,885 notes (originally from the-pietriarchy)


(Source: theaxqueen, via jokeperalta)

2 days ago | 459 notes (originally from theaxqueen)


The firm line of his mouth had relaxed in sleep. While it kept a faintly humorous curl at the corner, his lower lip now eased into a fuller curve that seemed both sensual and innocent.

 “Damn,” I said softly to myself.

I had been fighting it for some time. Even before this ridiculous marriage, I had been more than conscious of his attraction.

(Source: mrsassenach, via monica-vitti)

2 days ago | 1,404 notes (originally from mrsassenach)


Thirty-one Days of HalloweenThe Addams Family
↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

(via derevko)

3 days ago | 58,017 notes (originally from daxterdd)


Marvel:SVU

Marvel:SVU

(Source: aharsherworld, via demarches)


dukedukegoose:

5/5 Stars
I love books that just rather remind me of why I love this genre, and why I love reading, and what it is I “get out of it.” 
I hate the summarization part of reviewing books, I honestly believe it to be my weakest point, and I dislike toeing the line between giving too much away and not giving enough away that people would care to pick up the novel. So here’s yet another flailing attempt at it. 
Cynthia Brightley is an orphan, poor, and on the cusp of losing everything she’s spent nearly two years building up. A scandal rocks her world in London, resulting in the dissolution of a rather impressive engagement she managed to land, and thus propelling her ever and ever closer to utter destitution. In fact, she’s one two week house party away from it. 
Miles Redmond is the proud, second-now-ostensibly-first son of the Proud and Staid Redmond family. He’s scholarly, bookish, has been to the South Seas and is desperate to go back. Two years ago, he was slighted by the first woman that ever took his breath away. Now he’s hosting a two week house party for his parents, and his sister has brought along her new friend: the very woman who slighted him.
I will admit now, to start this review, I did not love the first in this series, The Perils of Pleasure. To this day, I still can’t explain what it was about that book that didn’t capture me, but it didn’t. This however had me from the first page. Everything about this book worked for me on multiple levels. 
Miles is bookish and scholarly and more concerned with the mating habits of butterflies and beetles than he is with much else. But he’s also adventurous and polite and mannerly and, in his own way, quite handsome. He’s not the bookish sort who does nothing but read and stutter when confronted with a woman or an awkward situation. There’s a wonderful complexity to Miles’ devotion to his family, and his desire to travel the world, and see everything there is to see.
Likewise, Cynthia is a beautifully drawn character. I love Cynthia. I could probably spend multiple paragraphs just talking about every single thing I love about Cynthia. But what I love about her is that, from an objective point of view, everything she does in this novel is calculating and a bit ruthless, and yet, she’s so wonderfully written that you absolutely sympathize with her completely. She’s desperate. She makes no bones about this, she doesn’t lie to herself, and she doesn’t excuse it. She has no idea what will become of her if she doesn’t get engaged by the end of this house party. And furthermore, she’s incredibly charming and capable of finding every person’s weak point. She exploits her wiles and her knowledge of people, but not in a cruel or heartless way. Cynthia sees the best in people, either because she needs to in order to keep her head above water, or because she just genuinely likes humanity. 
Throughout the novel, she draws out people’s best traits, and manages to gloss over their worst. She lies and somewhat deceives, but never out of malice, and never to hurt another person. She wants a family, she wants to be loved, she wants to be safe and I can’t imagine that any reader could fault her for it. 
Cynthia is somehow unbearably naive and horribly disillusioned all at once. She has a tragic backstory, but not one that overwhelms her character to the point that she becomes a travesty. Her life is what it is, and she’s simply trying to survive it. But unlike many tragic heroines, she’s not a victim of her circumstances. She still enjoys life, she has fun, she wants to live above all else. 
This book was at times (literally, and I never mean literally) laugh out loud funny and crying in a corner heartbreaking. I love this couple, but moreso, I love these characters individually. I love the development of this relationship, and how these two came together. I wish I could read a million more books that moved me the way this one did. 

dukedukegoose:

5/5 Stars

I love books that just rather remind me of why I love this genre, and why I love reading, and what it is I “get out of it.” 

I hate the summarization part of reviewing books, I honestly believe it to be my weakest point, and I dislike toeing the line between giving too much away and not giving enough away that people would care to pick up the novel. So here’s yet another flailing attempt at it. 

Cynthia Brightley is an orphan, poor, and on the cusp of losing everything she’s spent nearly two years building up. A scandal rocks her world in London, resulting in the dissolution of a rather impressive engagement she managed to land, and thus propelling her ever and ever closer to utter destitution. In fact, she’s one two week house party away from it. 

Miles Redmond is the proud, second-now-ostensibly-first son of the Proud and Staid Redmond family. He’s scholarly, bookish, has been to the South Seas and is desperate to go back. Two years ago, he was slighted by the first woman that ever took his breath away. Now he’s hosting a two week house party for his parents, and his sister has brought along her new friend: the very woman who slighted him.

I will admit now, to start this review, I did not love the first in this series, The Perils of Pleasure. To this day, I still can’t explain what it was about that book that didn’t capture me, but it didn’t. This however had me from the first page. Everything about this book worked for me on multiple levels. 

Miles is bookish and scholarly and more concerned with the mating habits of butterflies and beetles than he is with much else. But he’s also adventurous and polite and mannerly and, in his own way, quite handsome. He’s not the bookish sort who does nothing but read and stutter when confronted with a woman or an awkward situation. There’s a wonderful complexity to Miles’ devotion to his family, and his desire to travel the world, and see everything there is to see.

Likewise, Cynthia is a beautifully drawn character. I love Cynthia. I could probably spend multiple paragraphs just talking about every single thing I love about Cynthia. But what I love about her is that, from an objective point of view, everything she does in this novel is calculating and a bit ruthless, and yet, she’s so wonderfully written that you absolutely sympathize with her completely. She’s desperate. She makes no bones about this, she doesn’t lie to herself, and she doesn’t excuse it. She has no idea what will become of her if she doesn’t get engaged by the end of this house party. And furthermore, she’s incredibly charming and capable of finding every person’s weak point. She exploits her wiles and her knowledge of people, but not in a cruel or heartless way. Cynthia sees the best in people, either because she needs to in order to keep her head above water, or because she just genuinely likes humanity. 

Throughout the novel, she draws out people’s best traits, and manages to gloss over their worst. She lies and somewhat deceives, but never out of malice, and never to hurt another person. She wants a family, she wants to be loved, she wants to be safe and I can’t imagine that any reader could fault her for it. 

Cynthia is somehow unbearably naive and horribly disillusioned all at once. She has a tragic backstory, but not one that overwhelms her character to the point that she becomes a travesty. Her life is what it is, and she’s simply trying to survive it. But unlike many tragic heroines, she’s not a victim of her circumstances. She still enjoys life, she has fun, she wants to live above all else. 

This book was at times (literally, and I never mean literally) laugh out loud funny and crying in a corner heartbreaking. I love this couple, but moreso, I love these characters individually. I love the development of this relationship, and how these two came together. I wish I could read a million more books that moved me the way this one did. 


ashishorny:

Dear Liz Lemon,

While other women have bigger boobs than you, no other woman has as big a heart. When I saw you getting ready to go out and get nailed by a bunch of guys last night, I knew for sure it was over between us, and for the first time since the ‘86 World Series, I cried… I cried like a big, dumb homo. And if it was up to me, we’d be together forever. But there’s a new thing called “women’s liberation”, which gives you women the right to choose and you have chosen to abort me, and that I must live with. So tonight, when you arrive home, I’ll be gone. I officially renounce my squatter’s rights. Goodbye and good luck. I’ll never forget you.

(via derevko)